Dynamic Credit Card Type Selection - UX Lab 003
If you find yourself buying a lot of things online, or perhaps building a lot of eCommerce websites - you will have experienced a range of credit card forms. The good. The bad. The ugly. Some fields are required to pass security checks. Some seemingly exist only to frustrate you. But what seems constant is the lack of innovation over the years in what is a staple in eCommerce design.
One example that does it really well is the purchase page for Coda, by Panic Software. Not only does it auto-select the card type of the credit card, but it also updates the select button with a background image indicating progress. The only downside I can really find to the Coda page is that when the card image changes, it’s not sprited so you see a flash of white as the images load.
Using a list of prefixes published to Wikipedia, it’s possible to identify nearly every card type in the world. This opens a host of possibilities to designers, like this:

"CC Rebound" by Ryan Rumsey
Not shown in this demo is the ability to isolate the first two or three characters, to further narrow the type of card. How would you differentiate between Diner’s Club (36) and American Express (37), both starting with ‘3’? Using substr(). The rest is up to you.
 

Dynamic Credit Card Type Selection - UX Lab 003

If you find yourself buying a lot of things online, or perhaps building a lot of eCommerce websites - you will have experienced a range of credit card forms. The good. The bad. The ugly. Some fields are required to pass security checks. Some seemingly exist only to frustrate you. But what seems constant is the lack of innovation over the years in what is a staple in eCommerce design.

One example that does it really well is the purchase page for Coda, by Panic Software. Not only does it auto-select the card type of the credit card, but it also updates the select button with a background image indicating progress. The only downside I can really find to the Coda page is that when the card image changes, it’s not sprited so you see a flash of white as the images load.

Using a list of prefixes published to Wikipedia, it’s possible to identify nearly every card type in the world. This opens a host of possibilities to designers, like this:

image

"CC Rebound" by Ryan Rumsey

Not shown in this demo is the ability to isolate the first two or three characters, to further narrow the type of card. How would you differentiate between Diner’s Club (36) and American Express (37), both starting with ‘3’? Using substr(). The rest is up to you.

image image

  1. danlyons reblogged this from derbyboy and added:
    There’s nothing Panic puts out that isn’t fantastic… Including their HTML emails…
  2. derbyboy reblogged this from taitems and added:
    Cool!